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  • The definition of a mineral is an inorganic naturally occurring substance, this includes metals, the definition of a Gem is a mineral that has been cut or polished as an ornament, thus Bismuth is a Gem, and I demand the wiki be edited thusly, this is inaccurate.

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    • Gems, also Gemstones, usually do not include pure metals in it. That's why platinum, gold, and silver aren't considered gems as well.

      Another definition for a gem is:

      "A precious stone, usually of substantial monetary value or prized for its beauty or shine."

      One, it isn't considered a precious stone, not even a precious metal (gold, silver, and platinum are). Two, in terms of monetary value, bismuth isn't that expensive. This website prices pure Bismuth as $39 per 100g. To put in perspective, on the same website, it prices pure aluminium as $15.72 per 100g (a soda can is usually 14-15 grams of 99%+ pure aluminum), pure silver as $120 per 100g, pure gold as $5540 per 100g, and pure platinum as $13000 per 100g (mind you the prices are on 2012.) Three, bismuth's uses hardly ever uses jewelry. Native bismuth (or natural bismuth) is usually just grey. The iridescent sheen is usually made by melting and regrowing bismuth crystals in labs. Most of its uses goes to pharmaceuticals and cosmetics, as opposed to the aforementioned three precious metals' primary uses in jewelry.

      Also, semantics.

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    • Hey, can it be mentioned in the page that Bismuth is a Hopper Crystal? Or at least is part of that classification. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hopper_crystal

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    • Iudexkoo wrote: Gems, also Gemstones, usually do not include pure metals in it. That's why platinum, gold, and silver aren't considered gems as well.

      Another definition for a gem is:

      "A precious stone, usually of substantial monetary value or prized for its beauty or shine."

      One, it isn't considered a precious stone, not even a precious metal (gold, silver, and platinum are). Two, in terms of monetary value, bismuth isn't that expensive. This website prices pure Bismuth as $39 per 100g. To put in perspective, on the same website, it prices pure aluminium as $15.72 per 100g (a soda can is usually 14-15 grams of 99%+ pure aluminum), pure silver as $120 per 100g, pure gold as $5540 per 100g, and pure platinum as $13000 per 100g (mind you the prices are on 2012.) Three, bismuth's uses hardly ever uses jewelry. Native bismuth (or natural bismuth) is usually just grey. The iridescent sheen is usually made by melting and regrowing bismuth crystals in labs. Most of its uses goes to pharmaceuticals and cosmetics, as opposed to the aforementioned three precious metals' primary uses in jewelry.

      Also, semantics.

      These three pages disagree. [1]] and [[2]] (this page includes metal sales)

      [[3]]

      In Charecter design it is clear the crewniverse Researches their stuff so if they count Bismuth as a gem they know what they're talking about. Just saying.

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    • SUoveranalyzer wrote:

      These three pages disagree. [1]] and [[2]] (this page includes metal sales)

      [[3]]

      In Charecter design it is clear the crewniverse Researches their stuff so if they count Bismuth as a gem they know what they're talking about. Just saying.

      None of the pages you linked disagree with my statement really. Do not directly equate being a shiny mineral to being a gem, because if it was, all metals, not just bismuth, would be considered a gem.

      But in the show, in all intents and purposes, they use Bismuth as a gem, per se, but it's technically just a piece of metal turned gem.

      They probably used Bismuth for its crystal structure, rather than it being a gem.

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    • Iudexkoo wrote:

      SUoveranalyzer wrote:

      These three pages disagree. [1]] and [[2]] (this page includes metal sales)

      [[3]]

      In Charecter design it is clear the crewniverse Researches their stuff so if they count Bismuth as a gem they know what they're talking about. Just saying.

      None of the pages you linked disagree with my statement really. Do not directly equate being a shiny mineral to being a gem, because if it was, all metals, not just bismuth, would be considered a gem.

      But in the show, in all intents and purposes, they use Bismuth as a gem, per se, but it's technically just a piece of metal turned gem.

      They probably used Bismuth for its crystal structure, rather than it being a gem.

      Those were just to show that Bismuth and other metals are minerals. Tomatos are fruit yet they are in the vegetable aisle, its to prevent confusion! Many dictionaries say that for a mineral to be a gem it must be made into an ornament, a Google search like "Bismuth Jewelry" shows it is made into bracelets and other things, thus, Gem. Here is one of those definitions [[4]] Also, Bismuth isn't the only metal to crystallize, in fact, all metals can!

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    • SUoveranalyzer wrote: Those were just to show that Bismuth and other metals are minerals. Tomatos are fruit yet they are in the vegetable aisle, its to prevent confusion! Many dictionaries say that for a mineral to be a gem it must be made into an ornament, a Google search like "Bismuth Jewelry" shows it is made into bracelets and other things, thus, Gem. Here is one of those definitions [[1]] Also, Bismuth isn't the only metal to crystallize, in fact, all metals can!

      Yeah, I never said only bismuth is the only metal with a crystal structure.

      The point being. Every metal can be turned into jewelry. That doesn't mean every metal is a gem, now is it? If I take a silver spoon and hang it around my neck, is it considered a gem? Since it's a mineral that's polished and used as an ornament? Thus a gem?

      Also, I never said that bismuth cannot be turned into jewelry, rather that, its primary uses are more of pharmaceuticals and cosmetics rather than something to be worn.

      Tomato's a fruit because it's the ripened ovary of a flower. It's placed in the vegetable isle (much like other vege fruits; squash, cucumber, eggplant, and what not). As most fruits are readily eaten once bought. Tomatoes, and other veggie fruits, aren't readily eaten, more of its focus is that it's served better when cooked.

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    • Pearls, Opals, and Lapis Lazulis are also not gems: Pearls and Opals are organic, non crystalline minerals, while Lapis Lazulis are inorganic, non-crystalline rocks. Not saying you're wrong, just saying that the Crewniverse's standards for what constitutes Gems are already pretty low, and have been for a while.

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    • Chromascope3D wrote: Pearls, Opals, and Lapis Lazulis are also not gems: Pearls and Opals are organic, non crystalline minerals, while Lapis Lazulis are inorganic, non-crystalline rocks. Not saying you're wrong, just saying that the Crewniverse's standards for what constitutes Gems are already pretty low, and have been for a while.

      Yeah, but unlike Bismuth, Pearls. Opals, and Lazulis are sold, marketed, and even considered Gemstones, mineraloids to be exact, and those are part of the Gem. As said by the staff member up above, gems are that, merchandise

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    • Iudexkoo wrote:

      SUoveranalyzer wrote: Those were just to show that Bismuth and other metals are minerals. Tomatos are fruit yet they are in the vegetable aisle, its to prevent confusion! Many dictionaries say that for a mineral to be a gem it must be made into an ornament, a Google search like "Bismuth Jewelry" shows it is made into bracelets and other things, thus, Gem. Here is one of those definitions [[1]] Also, Bismuth isn't the only metal to crystallize, in fact, all metals can!

      Yeah, I never said only bismuth is the only metal with a crystal structure.

      The point being. Every metal can be turned into jewelry. That doesn't mean every metal is a gem, now is it? If I take a silver spoon and hang it around my neck, is it considered a gem? Since it's a mineral that's polished and used as an ornament? Thus a gem?

      Also, I never said that bismuth cannot be turned into jewelry, rather that, its primary uses are more of pharmaceuticals and cosmetics rather than something to be worn.

      Tomato's a fruit because it's the ripened ovary of a flower. It's placed in the vegetable isle (much like other vege fruits; squash, cucumber, eggplant, and what not). As most fruits are readily eaten once bought. Tomatoes, and other veggie fruits, aren't readily eaten, more of its focus is that it's served better when cooked.

      It's still made into rather interesting jewelry so it is very much a Gemstone by all definitions. Well, that spoon isn't meant to be an ornament. Yeah, however vegetables are defined as every other edible part of a plant other than the Fruit yet still there are fruit placed in its grouping. In the end human classification can break its own rules sometimes, due to technicality and properties.

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    • SUoveranalyzer wrote:

      It's still made into rather interesting jewelry so it is very much a Gemstone by all definitions. Well, that spoon isn't meant to be an ornament. Yeah, however vegetables are defined as every other edible part of a plant other than the Fruit yet still there are fruit placed in its grouping. In the end human classification can break its own rules sometimes, due to technicality and properties.

      >>that spoon isn't meant to be an ornament.
      Eeeeexactly. The spoon isn't meant to be a gem, but it's a polished mineral that's used as an ornament but is still a spoon. Same with bismuth, the metal isn't meant to be used as an ornament rather, it has more practical uses, even when worn it is still considered a metal.

      >>Yeah, however vegetables are defined as every other edible part of a plant other than the Fruit yet still there are fruit placed in its grouping.
      vegetable (/ˈved͡ʒtəbəl/)
      1. any member of the vegetable kingdom; plant.
      2. any part of a plant that is consumed by humans as food as part of a savory meal.
      3. a plant raised for some edible part of it, such as the leaves, roots, fruit or flowers, but excluding any plant considered to be a fruit, grain, or spice in the culinary sense.
      4. made from, obtained from, or containing plants or plant products
      5. A plant cultivated for its edible parts, such as the roots of the beet, the leaves of spinach, the flower buds of broccoli, or the fruit or seeds of certain species, as beans, corn, and squash.

      >>In the end human classification can break its own rules sometimes, due to technicality and properties.
      The end.

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    • Iudexkoo wrote:
      SUoveranalyzer wrote:

      It's still made into rather interesting jewelry so it is very much a Gemstone by all definitions. Well, that spoon isn't meant to be an ornament. Yeah, however vegetables are defined as every other edible part of a plant other than the Fruit yet still there are fruit placed in its grouping. In the end human classification can break its own rules sometimes, due to technicality and properties.

      >>that spoon isn't meant to be an ornament.
      Eeeeexactly. The spoon isn't meant to be a gem, but it's a polished mineral that's used as an ornament but is still a spoon. Same with bismuth, the metal isn't meant to be used as an ornament rather, it has more practical uses, even when worn it is still considered a metal.

      >>Yeah, however vegetables are defined as every other edible part of a plant other than the Fruit yet still there are fruit placed in its grouping.
      vegetable (/ˈved͡ʒtəbəl/)
      1. any member of the vegetable kingdom; plant.
      2. any part of a plant that is consumed by humans as food as part of a savory meal.
      3. a plant raised for some edible part of it, such as the leaves, roots, fruit or flowers, but excluding any plant considered to be a fruit, grain, or spice in the culinary sense.
      4. made from, obtained from, or containing plants or plant products
      5. A plant cultivated for its edible parts, such as the roots of the beet, the leaves of spinach, the flower buds of broccoli, or the fruit or seeds of certain species, as beans, corn, and squash.

      >>In the end human classification can break its own rules sometimes, due to technicality and properties.
      The end.

      botanical definition   For Fruits vs Vegetables 

      A spoon is a tool not an ornament, and I dont think it is polished, but if it was technically Gem, once again it's mislabeled to prevent confusion like Tomatos in the veg aisle.

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    • SUoveranalyzer wrote:

      botanical definition   For Fruits vs Vegetables 

      A spoon is a tool not an ornament, and I dont think it is polished, but if it was technically Gem, once again it's mislabeled to prevent confusion like Tomatos in the veg aisle.

      The link you gave just asnwered your querie. The tomato is botanically a fruit (as with squashes, peapods, eggplants, and what not) but the US supreme court taxes them as vegetables, that's why they're included in the veggie section. And second, the article says that fruits that are savoury rather than sweet, are culinarily defined as vegetables, hence its placement in the veggie section, as its use is more of being added to dishes, as with other vegetables, rather than being eaten as is, as with the culinarily defined fruits as they are sweet.

      You know, its as if you refuse to accept the definition of "used as an ornament". I know the spoon is a tool. I'm saying that, if it's used as an ornament rather than its intended purpose, does it make the spoon-turned-neckalce a gem? (I'm using silverwear, as in a silver spoon as an example btw if you didn't quite catch that)

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    • Discussion about metals end in tomatoes. Nice.


      But I'd just like to add that that is the crystalized form of Bismuth, not the pure metal one found naturally in the world.

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    • AquaticPanic wrote:
      Discussion about metals end in tomatoes. Nice.


      But I'd just like to add that that is the crystalized form of Bismuth, not the pure metal one found naturally in the world.

      Red herrings. What can you do? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

      Most bismuths used in laboratories to grow the crystals are pure, or as close as to being pure, as that is preferred.

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    • I mean that this is bismuth found in the nature:

      Bismuth IRL (Brute)










      The one in the show is the modifyed crystalized form

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    • AquaticPanic wrote:
      I mean that this is bismuth found in the nature:
      Bismuth IRL (Brute)










      The one in the show is the modifyed crystalized form

      Yeah. Native bismuth is pretty much just what you'd expect a metal found underground looks like. All metals have a crystal structure, as said above. To get that shiny hoppered bismuth, you literally just melt it and let it cool. The hoppering occurs because the edges grow rapidly than the interior can keep up. The iridescent sheen is caused by oxides that latch on to the surface. And all you need to make it is a stove, pure bismuth ingots, a pan, and any heat resistant container to cool it in.

      Also, you don't need to modify it. Any metal can be seen in its crystallized form by letting it grow properly, which is harder to achieve in some. Also applies to other substances, namely salts.

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    • The Element Bismuth is in the "Post-Transition Metal" Group, and is classified as a Metal on the Periodic Table. Bismuth is a Metal, not a Gem. The reason why Bismuth looks like a Gem is becuause Bismuth has a natural Monoclinic Crystal Strucuture, which I believe is most commonly found in Gems. 

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    • I have an idea, why don't we just end this discussion here and wait for the episode to air?

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    • AquaticPanic wrote:
      I have an idea, why don't we just end this discussion here and wait for the episode to air?

      I mean Bismuth is a metal its a singular element 'Bi', whereas a Gem is a combination of elements... Unless Bismuth is a combo of other elements and Bismuth then I guess you can call her a Gem but thats stretching it a bit.

      For know I say put Bismuth as a Metal because that is what the Element is. Until the episode clarifies, either that or change the Race Tab to say "Not Known" or just leave it blank for the time being.

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    • Iudexkoo wrote:

      AquaticPanic wrote:
      I mean that this is bismuth found in the nature:
      Bismuth IRL (Brute)

      It is called Hopper Crystal BTW QUARTZES CAN BE HOPPER CRYSTALS










      The one in the show is the modifyed crystalized form

      Yeah. Native bismuth is pretty much just what you'd expect a metal found underground looks like. All metals have a crystal structure, as said above. To get that shiny hoppered bismuth, you literally just melt it and let it cool. The hoppering occurs because the edges grow rapidly than the interior can keep up. The iridescent sheen is caused by oxides that latch on to the surface. And all you need to make it is a stove, pure bismuth ingots, a pan, and any heat resistant container to cool it in.

      Also, you don't need to modify it. Any metal can be seen in its crystallized form by letting it grow properly, which is harder to achieve in some. Also applies to other substances, namely salts.

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    • HarringtonLittle wrote:

      AquaticPanic wrote:
      I have an idea, why don't we just end this discussion here and wait for the episode to air?

      I mean Bismuth is a metal its a singular element 'Bi', whereas a Gem is a combination of elements... Unless Bismuth is a combo of other elements and Bismuth then I guess you can call her a Gem but thats stretching it a bit.

      For know I say put Bismuth as a Metal because that is what the Element is. Until the episode clarifies, either that or change the Race Tab to say "Not Known" or just leave it blank for the time being.

      You don't need to change the race tab, she is clearly a gem in the show and a member of the Crystal Gems. I don't see a rule that Gems must be several elements but Bismuth's rainbow color comes from Bismuth oxide so it has oxygen.... 2. Anyways, Metals are minerals, Bismuth is a mineral, and its crystal form, so it counts. This discussion arose from the wiki page saying in the trivia that Bismuth isn't a gem but a metal.

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    • HarringtonLittle wrote: The Element Bismuth is in the "Post-Transition Metal" Group, and is classified as a Metal on the Periodic Table. Bismuth is a Metal, not a Gem. The reason why Bismuth looks like a Gem is becuause Bismuth has a natural Monoclinic Crystal Strucuture, which I believe is most commonly found in Gems. 

      A gem, like I said earlier is a mineral in Crystal form that is made into an ornament, Metals, fit snugly in the definition of minerals, thus, Bismuth, a crystal metal, fits. Especially since it is made into jewelry. A mineral is any inorganic substance that forms naturally, that includes metals and water\Ice.

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    • HarringtonLittle wrote: The Element Bismuth is in the "Post-Transition Metal" Group, and is classified as a Metal on the Periodic Table. Bismuth is a Metal, not a Gem. The reason why Bismuth looks like a Gem is becuause Bismuth has a natural Monoclinic Crystal Strucuture, which I believe is most commonly found in Gems. 

      Also, any metal can crystallize.

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    • Iudexkoo wrote:

      SUoveranalyzer wrote:

      botanical definition   For Fruits vs Vegetables 

      A spoon is a tool not an ornament, and I dont think it is polished, but if it was technically Gem, once again it's mislabeled to prevent confusion like Tomatos in the veg aisle.

      The link you gave just asnwered your querie. The tomato is botanically a fruit (as with squashes, peapods, eggplants, and what not) but the US supreme court taxes them as vegetables, that's why they're included in the veggie section. And second, the article says that fruits that are savoury rather than sweet, are culinarily defined as vegetables, hence its placement in the veggie section, as its use is more of being added to dishes, as with other vegetables, rather than being eaten as is, as with the culinarily defined fruits as they are sweet.

      You know, its as if you refuse to accept the definition of "used as an ornament". I know the spoon is a tool. I'm saying that, if it's used as an ornament rather than its intended purpose, does it make the spoon-turned-neckalce a gem? (I'm using silverwear, as in a silver spoon as an example btw if you didn't quite catch that)

      Refuse it? It's one of my points how dam I refusing it? Also I suppose pure metal tools and objects and things don't count as Gems because they are not in Crystal form, they have to be crystal metal. In fact I don't think that I have mentioned that the mineral has to be Crystal by definition.

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    • More or less. Any solid metal will always be in its crystal form because the atoms will always take shape in its natural crystalline structure when allowed to solidify. But we humans just reshape them, masking their natural structure for forms that are useful to us. If you look at a silver spoon's atoms, they are still arranged structurally as a crystal, that structure being the face centered-cubic, with a variation of that used by diamonds, but outwardly it's shaped like a spoon, to hold our soup. Even diamonds are like that. Natural diamonds are, more or less, cubic in shape due to it's crystal structure, but we humans reshape it; cutting and polishing it to fit our desires. A diamond will never grow into a heart shape, nor a circle for it's atom structure will not allow it.


      This article seems to explain it. An excerpt from it:

      "Can All Minerals be Gemstones?

      If you take the common definition, then yes, all gemstones can be minerals. You just have to cut or polish them and then set it in a piece of jewelry. In practice however this will never happen.

      Certain minerals are either far too small to ever be used, like certain platinum group crystals. Others are far too fragile to polish, let alone cut, an example of this would be zeolite.

      There also are minerals that nobody in their right mind would want to wear. The most obvious example being white and blue asbestos, which can cause lung diseases including lung cancer.

      The main reason why some minerals will never be gemstones is simply because they are far too common or are just not beautiful enough.

      So while it certainly is possible for all minerals to be gemstones if you take the common definition. In practice only a very small amount of minerals will ever be gemstones, a title they will have to share with certain rocks and organic matter"


      So, in a way, SUoveranalyzer, you are correct for saying that bismuth is a gem, but by that definition, all minerals (metals, salts, and all) should be considered gemstones as well. As practically all minerals can be polished and placed on some jewelry and can be worn.

      In the end, it all comes down to human subjectivity. That's why a diamond is a gem while a piece of graphite isn't even though both are made of the same exact substances.

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    • SUoveranalyzer wrote:

      HarringtonLittle wrote: The Element Bismuth is in the "Post-Transition Metal" Group, and is classified as a Metal on the Periodic Table. Bismuth is a Metal, not a Gem. The reason why Bismuth looks like a Gem is becuause Bismuth has a natural Monoclinic Crystal Strucuture, which I believe is most commonly found in Gems. 

      A gem, like I said earlier is a mineral in Crystal form that is made into an ornament, Metals, fit snugly in the definition of minerals, thus, Bismuth, a crystal metal, fits. Especially since it is made into jewelry. A mineral is any inorganic substance that forms naturally, that includes metals and water\Ice.

      That is the definition for Mineral, but there are requisits for a material to be a mineral, not everything can. Be. A. Mimeral

      Requisits:

      "To meet the definition of "mineral" used by most geologists a substance must meet five requirements: naturally occurring inorganic solid definite chemical composition ordered internal structure "Naturally occurring" means that people did not make it. Steel is not a mineral because it is an alloy produced by people. "Inorganic" means that the substance is not made by an organism. Wood and pearls are made by organisms and thus are not minerals. "Solid" means that it is not a liquid or a gas at standard temperature and pressure.

      "Definite chemical composition" means that all occurrences of that mineral have a chemical composition that varies within a specific limited range. For example: the mineral halite (known as "rock salt" when it is mined) has a chemical composition of NaCl. It is made up of an equal number of atoms of sodium and chlorine.

      "Ordered internal structure" means that the atoms in a mineral are arranged in a systematic and repeating pattern. The structure of the mineral halite is shown in the illustration at right. Halite is composed of an equal ratio of sodium and chlorine atoms arranged in a cubic pattern. " [1]

      1. http://geology.com/minerals/what-is-a-mineral.shtml

      But Bismuth itself does not vary, it is always, Bismuth, except when it is impure, but otherwise, always Bismuth.

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    • Metals, and their alloys, still fit into the criteria you posted btw. For bimusth, it is naturally occuring either as native (pure) or part of an alloy. It is inorganic and solid at room temp., though slightly brittle than aluminum or gold. It has a definite chemical composition, like repeating units of Bi in a rhombohedral crystal structure.

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    • Iudexkoo wrote: Metals, and their alloys, still fit into the criteria you posted btw. For bimusth, it is naturally occuring either as native (pure) or part of an alloy. It is inorganic and solid at room temp., though slightly brittle than aluminum or gold. It has a definite chemical composition, like repeating units of Bi in a rhombohedral crystal structure.

      Alloys, maybe, but they are not the same material, but repeating Bi, nonono, it needs to have, at the very least, two different main components, not two of the same

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    • The Mind Player wrote:

      Iudexkoo wrote: Metals, and their alloys, still fit into the criteria you posted btw. For bimusth, it is naturally occuring either as native (pure) or part of an alloy. It is inorganic and solid at room temp., though slightly brittle than aluminum or gold. It has a definite chemical composition, like repeating units of Bi in a rhombohedral crystal structure.

      Alloys, maybe, but they are not the same material, but repeating Bi, nonono, it needs to have, at the very least, two different main components, not two of the same

      Cough*diamond*cough

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    • The Mind Player wrote:

      SUoveranalyzer wrote:

      HarringtonLittle wrote: The Element Bismuth is in the "Post-Transition Metal" Group, and is classified as a Metal on the Periodic Table. Bismuth is a Metal, not a Gem. The reason why Bismuth looks like a Gem is becuause Bismuth has a natural Monoclinic Crystal Strucuture, which I believe is most commonly found in Gems. 

      A gem, like I said earlier is a mineral in Crystal form that is made into an ornament, Metals, fit snugly in the definition of minerals, thus, Bismuth, a crystal metal, fits. Especially since it is made into jewelry. A mineral is any inorganic substance that forms naturally, that includes metals and water\Ice.

      That is the definition for Mineral, but there are requisits for a material to be a mineral, not everything can. Be. A. Mimeral

      Requisits:

      "To meet the definition of "mineral" used by most geologists a substance must meet five requirements: naturally occurring inorganic solid definite chemical composition ordered internal structure "Naturally occurring" means that people did not make it. Steel is not a mineral because it is an alloy produced by people. "Inorganic" means that the substance is not made by an organism. Wood and pearls are made by organisms and thus are not minerals. "Solid" means that it is not a liquid or a gas at standard temperature and pressure.

      "Definite chemical composition" means that all occurrences of that mineral have a chemical composition that varies within a specific limited range. For example: the mineral halite (known as "rock salt" when it is mined) has a chemical composition of NaCl. It is made up of an equal number of atoms of sodium and chlorine.

      "Ordered internal structure" means that the atoms in a mineral are arranged in a systematic and repeating pattern. The structure of the mineral halite is shown in the illustration at right. Halite is composed of an equal ratio of sodium and chlorine atoms arranged in a cubic pattern. " [1]

      1. http://geology.com/minerals/what-is-a-mineral.shtml

      But Bismuth itself does not vary, it is always, Bismuth, except when it is impure, but otherwise, always Bismuth.

      Well,crystal Bismuth contains Bismuth oxide, also Diamond, is pure carbon.

      Pearl gets free ride because humans consider them gems.Along with other organics. Also calcium carbonate is technically a mineral, occurring naturally as calcite.

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    • Iudexkoo wrote: More or less. Any solid metal will always be in its crystal form because the atoms will always take shape in its natural crystalline structure when allowed to solidify. But we humans just reshape them, masking their natural structure for forms that are useful to us. If you look at a silver spoon's atoms, they are still arranged structurally as a crystal, that structure being the face centered-cubic, with a variation of that used by diamonds, but outwardly it's shaped like a spoon, to hold our soup. Even diamonds are like that. Natural diamonds are, more or less, cubic in shape due to it's crystal structure, but we humans reshape it; cutting and polishing it to fit our desires. A diamond will never grow into a heart shape, nor a circle for it's atom structure will not allow it.


      This article seems to explain it. An excerpt from it:

      "Can All Minerals be Gemstones?

      If you take the common definition, then yes, all gemstones can be minerals. You just have to cut or polish them and then set it in a piece of jewelry. In practice however this will never happen.

      Certain minerals are either far too small to ever be used, like certain platinum group crystals. Others are far too fragile to polish, let alone cut, an example of this would be zeolite.

      There also are minerals that nobody in their right mind would want to wear. The most obvious example being white and blue asbestos, which can cause lung diseases including lung cancer.

      The main reason why some minerals will never be gemstones is simply because they are far too common or are just not beautiful enough.

      So while it certainly is possible for all minerals to be gemstones if you take the common definition. In practice only a very small amount of minerals will ever be gemstones, a title they will have to share with certain rocks and organic matter"


      So, in a way, SUoveranalyzer, you are correct for saying that bismuth is a gem, but by that definition, all minerals (metals, salts, and all) should be considered gemstones as well. As practically all minerals can be polished and placed on some jewelry and can be worn.

      In the end, it all comes down to human subjectivity. That's why a diamond is a gem while a piece of graphite isn't even though both are made of the same exact substances.

      You are exactly right! More gems? Whats not to like?

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    • I still would say not to class Bismuth as a Gem until the show clarifies this... change her Race to Not Known or something... I agree that Bismuth out all the metals is most likely to be classed as a Gem because for one there is no Gem that has Bismuth in its chemical formula.

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    • You guys are getting way to worked up about a gem/mineral/rock/crystal that hasn't even been shown on tv yet.

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    • HarringtonLittle wrote:

      I still would say not to class Bismuth as a Gem until the show clarifies this... change her Race to Not Known or something... I agree that Bismuth out all the metals is most likely to be classed as a Gem because for one there is no Gem that has Bismuth in its chemical formula.

      I agree. Besides, we are not the creators, so therefore we have no idea where they are going with this, despite how many hints they have dropped. All that we know is that Bismuth is a character now and she was bubbled for a really long time.

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    • HarringtonLittle wrote:

      I still would say not to class Bismuth as a Gem until the show clarifies this... change her Race to Not Known or something... I agree that Bismuth out all the metals is most likely to be classed as a Gem because for one there is no Gem that has Bismuth in its chemical formula.

      What? She is clearly a gem.... she's Even a crystal Gem.

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    • A FANDOM user
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